My review of Judah’s Wife

My review of Judah’s Wife

I recieved this book from Bethany House Publishers (a division of Baker Publishing Group) in exchange for an un-biased review… Here goes…

I truly enjoyed the writing style of Angela Hunt, and I’ve never read any of her novels in the past, and so reading this book made me curious as to what else she has written. She writes with a clear sense of direction, and I would say that her novel was more plot driven than character driven. That is to say, while I understood Leah and Judah’s motivations for doing things, I did not feel like they were alive in the same way I would with the characters of other novels. Because of the historical nature and era Angela Hunt was writing about however, I felt that this was not a hindrance to the story, but rather let me see the ancient world the Maccabees lived in.

The main characters Leah and Judah overcome two very different families in order to realize both who they are, and what they believe about God, and finally, what God wants from them. Leah comes from an abusive background, but rather than write out scenes that put this fact into flesh, the reader is told this early on, and then lives with the tension that the blow might come at any moment. (That is one of the ways in which Angela Hunt has mastered the written word). Judah on the other hand comes from a very devout family yet for much of the book has no clear idea of how to connect with his family’s God. Therefore, though the two main characters are quite different, they both grow expontentially in this novel.

The only sad thing about this novel is that since the writer does not believe the miracle of the long lasting oil happened, she does not write about it. This troubles me, and to be honest, its why I withhold one star. I will look for other books written by this author, however I will also read up on the subject before diving into the world she creates.

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Review: The Ladies of Ivy Cottage

Review: The Ladies of Ivy Cottage

I received a free copy of this title for an unbiased review. Here goes,

I am a fan of Julie Klassen, and I’ve read nearly everything she’s ever written, with the exception of the first book in this series.  That being said, some series are written in such a way that if you miss the first book it shouldn’t matter, and you should be able to pick up a book and understand who’s who and what’s what within minutes.  Alas, this was not the case for this book.  It took me a good 75 pages before I understood who was who and what was what. In other words, the characters were a bit muddled for me, and the women seemed too much alike for me to clearly follow their stories lines.  I’ll attribute this to my own lack of reading the first book.

What I loved, and what I generally think Ms. Klassen excels in is writing setting.  One really feels like one is in their little town. In addition to her fantastic use of setting, in the front of the novel their is a map of the town.  I’ve not read a book that had a map in the front of it for quite some time but it was a nice addition.

Finally, I never knew what exactly a circulating library was, and through this novel I got to learn a lot about how they were set up, and how they were precursors to our modern day libraries!  Any day I can learn something new from a novel is a good day.

Four out of Five Stars I’d say.

 

 

 

The Sound of Rain

The Sound of Rain

The Sound of Rain is a period piece set in Myrtle Beach in the 1950s. The main characters, Larkin and Jude are both well crafted full fleshed characters in search of their purpose in life.  After a mining disaster Jude thinks its his duty to live the life his brother planned.  After a hurricane, Larkin is intent on serving the poor in the back mountains of Kentucky.  Through various trials and tribulations, they realize that their intial goals are smaller compared to what God dreams for them.

I really enjoyed this novel from Sarah Loudin Thomas. The pacing of the story was a bit slower than I’m used to reading, but the reality of it is that it really puts you in the southern way of not rushing through a story, but really savoring it.

If any criticism can be made about this story is that while I enjoyed the ending, I thought it was a bit odd, yet some how it fit the rest of the narrative.

 

I was given a copy of this novel in exchange for my un-biased review. Thank you Bethany House.

My review of “Deadly Proof”

My review of “Deadly Proof”

So Bethany House Publishers sent me this book, “Deadly Proof” by Rachel Dylan in exchange for my honest review.  They sent it to me at the end of September, and since I gave birth to my son last week (2 weeks earlier than expected!), I’m about a week late in posting my review, however here’s my thoughts on the novel:

Deadly Proof is a Big Pharma suspense novel likened in tone to John Grisham.  There are some similarities with Camy Tang’s suspense novels, if you like her (I do) and even a dash of romance for those of us who like our detective type stories with a spoonful of sugar.

The main character Kate Sullivan is a middle aged lawyer in Atlanta who is lead council for a Big Pharma case.  When people start dropping dead around her, she wises up to the fact that this case may not be so easy, it might be a situation where prayer is needed just to survive the day! Together with private investigator Landon James, they uncover the messy world of Big Pharma and justice prevails.

 

What I liked: I liked how Kate wasn’t some young ingénue. So many times in novels the main character is 1 year out of law school but for whatever reason is up for a position that it would have realistically cost years of her life to attain.  Call me a realist, but I like that Kate has some years on her. I also liked how she and Landon worked together. It felt organic, and not forced.  I additionally loved how the novel made me see Atlanta.  The setting was definitely a character in the book, and now I’m curious enough about the city to want to go there.

What I didn’t like: The only thing that drove me nearly to distraction was how in every scene Landon was in we the reader were reminded how he was an Army Ranger.  That is awesome, and I would thank him for his service if he was real, however I felt like the author was using his military background as a lazy way of saying why he was so good at tracking people down or doing all sorts of other things that he does in the novel.  I felt like the author could have mentioned this a few times and then left it up to the reader.  I felt like every time Landon was introduced captioned under his name ought to be the phrase “a man with a very special set of skills.”

Summary:  I really enjoyed reading this book.  I read it during my kid’s nap time, and I will be looking out for the next book in the Atlanta Justice series. Thank you Bethany House for my copy!

 

 

 

Visions of harvest

Visions of harvest

So I was at community group this past weekend and while we were praying I had a vision of the harvest. Before you get excited, contrary to what I’ve always been taught, I saw all of us there as the harvest, not the workers, but us as sheaves of wheat, hands lifted high in surrender. At first it was just a pile but then my vision panned out and I saw thousands in worship. 
How beautiful was that?